Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Calling An Irish Speaking Herbalist!

Posting this on the wild chance that someone out there might know the answer! What does Slán Iomaire mean? I know its the Irish name for Red Valerian, but would love a proper translation. The dictionary, and my weak Irish has left me a bit confused... (healthy ridge?)

18 comments:

Jan Morrison said...

I wish I knew but I'm just commenting to tell you that this is a wonderful way to do research! I've been researching plants as well - for my book True - there is a shamanic healer from the Blackfoot Tribe that teaches my protagonist about healing plants in the Canadian west - sage etc...
lots of fun AND confusing.
good luck!

Words A Day said...

Thats a coincidence Jan:)
It's a really interesting area of research, will let you know if my plea works:)
ps good luck with your novel too, it sounds intriquing!

Brigid said...

The really shameful thing for me is that my degree is in Irish (and economics, weird mix), Niamh. I should know that but haven't spoken the native tongue in years. I had a lecturer in Irish - mac con Iomaire- which is son of an Iomaire, so dying to hear what it is?
Good luck with your research:)

Old Kitty said...

I know a valerian plant when I see one so yay for me! LOL! But am totally useless with the answer to your question! So booo for me! :-)

Oooh I hope you do discover what these wonderful words mean! Good luck! Take care
x

Words A Day said...

Brigid
I wonder if its there's a connection there, if its also a last name, as in 'the health of the Iomaire's'...

but I agree on you and your Irish degree, you should know, its shameful altogether,a disgrace, how you even put your foot out the door?!... :)

Words A Day said...

old kitty
thanks, and good on you for getting the valerian!

Ann said...

My Irish doesn't extend to this either. I am shamed having lived in An Rinn until the move to the US. I can make enquiries for you from a friend of mine still living there.

Liza said...

I'm no help, but just seeing the flowers today made me smile.

Helena said...

Hi Niamh, interesting challenge, I found this, might be helpful - "Ridge" Name Meaning in English: topographic name for someone who lived on or by a ridge, Middle English rigge, or a habitational name from any of the places named with this word, as for example Ridge in Hertfordshire. The surname is also fairly common in Ireland, in County Galway, having been taken to Connacht/Connemara in the early 17th century. The name is sometimes Gaelicized as Mac Iomaire; iomaire is modern Irish for ‘ridge’.

Helena said...

some more revelations
Mac an Iomaire is a gaelicisation of the Anglo-Irish surname, Ridge, which is recorded in County Roscommon in the early 17th century. Some thirty householders named Ridge were located in Connemara, County Galway, according to Griffith's Valuation of 1847-64.

Some use the form Mac Con Iomaire which is, however, a gaelicisation of the surname Montgomery.

Helena said...

Mmh, now I wonder if it's called Slan Iomaire because it is the last local plant that you see as you take the train away from Connemara? "A perennial plant, frequently found growing on railway embankments, old stone walls and coastal pathways". Also, I came across an old Irish botanist with the name Seamus Mac An Iomaire, is that something like a herbalist??? coincidence! good luck with the research.

Words A Day said...

Ann
I'd appreciate that:)Thanks so much.

Words A Day said...

Helena
Thats brilliant Helena, thanks for all that, its a lot to go on. Sounds like it could be named after where it grows or your botanist... I'd assumed it was slán as in health, sláinte rather than slan, as in goodbye...not too sure now. Again thanks a million, I owe you a pint:)

Hart Johnson said...

Well Google translate is no help at all. But the only Iomaire things I see are proper names. Looks like Helena is a lot more helpful (she is like that)

Niamh B said...

mr vc has posted the question on an irish translator's forum - so far no one has given an answer as good as Helena, but I'll let you know if they do

Anonymous said...

Hi Niamh,
I was searching for you online after reading your story after Crannog launch end of Feb. enjoyed it very much. Iomaire means a rower as in oarsman - that's me throwing my oar in!
Best of luck
Evelyn Parsons

Niamh said...

Evelyn
Rower, thats really interesting, Thanks for throwing your oar in! Really glad you liked the story

WOMEN RULE WRITER said...

Bear in mind that 'iomaire' is a genitive. To the best of my knowledge, 'iomar' means vessel/reservoir. So Slán Iomaire could mean something like 'good vessel' or 'effective vessel' or 'whole vessel'.